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Rick

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About Rick

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  • Birthday 01/01/1970
  1. if they're threaded, then you could just thread, say a bridge post into them, then pull it as hard as you can
  2. imo, best off with heavier gauges with such an obtuse angle from tail to bridge. i've moved from 11-50 to 12-54 now. if you can't get used to 11's, then best advice is to tune them up half a step. then when you tune back to normal (after a few days playing or so) you'll have an arm like popeye
  3. nah, i doubt it. there's always a bit of play in those shafts. you have to buy vintage stackpole pots if you don't want any play. but like i say, it doesn't matter, because it has nothing to do with the circuit contact or anything
  4. like lambtron says, far too expensive for a left handed american jag or jazzy. it would have to be custom shop, and that could cost you over $3000. if it was me, i'd just get a japanese one, they make them in lefty
  5. yeah, i'm none too keen on the string spacing at the bridge. you get used to it after a while, but i prefer F spaced
  6. i'm almost certain they're all 7.25" radius. though the warmoth ones may have a 12"-16" compound radius, or whatever they do
  7. all these valve amps are surely better for harmonic distortion, when cranked up? though the clean is nice at around 30-40% of volume, you might be best off with something solid state...
  8. i suppose it would be nice to say the body was a one piece. but imo, i can't see a quantum leap in 'tone' from it. virtually every jag ever made is several piece anyway
  9. i meant the inner sleeve, if that's what it's called? and it's not white, it's definately sonic blue:
  10. heh, i think my fingers would be hanging off if i somehow managed to break those switches
  11. i agree. it is much heavier. the '65 is more of a halfway house between a standard japanese fender (deluxe, or whatever you'd call them) and an american vintage series. the '65 has vintage correct headstock, decal, nut width, saddles, trem arm, trem plate, knobs and pickguard. it also has a dark rosewood slab fretboard, slab body, rounded body edges, brass shielding plates in the routes and some cloth wrapped wires. it may also have CTS pots and better pickups. there are probably other things i haven't mentioned too. although i still think as far as craftsmanship, there is nothing wrong with
  12. i don't think there's any difference, is there?
  13. i'm just trying to think if the strat ones would be suitable?
  14. nah, i think we'll let this one stay. it looks like you've done a good job in making these. the 60's one looks pretty much dead on
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