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I was wondering what guage strings you all use on your stang?

I am using super slinkys (9-42) because that's what I started using since I got my first guitar. I was wondering how much of a difference heavier guage strings will give? I've still got two packets of super slinkys left so I don't want to let them go to waste if I decide to change to a heavier guage.

Cheers :-D

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Usually anything from .011 - .013, especially if the sets have weird set matches for the strings (higher end E-D, lower end G-e, complete reverse of what most people would want, but people actually do it, I think I read Lou Barlow strings his up like this. Is that what decades of pot does to a guitar player?).

I don't normally like the slinkier strings on this guitar, since the heavy-gauge tension and lower tuning seems to keep it in tune longer, but when I got back from a friend a few weeks ago someone had strung it with .008s or .009s. I'd been playing for a few weeks on a CIJ Jaguar Baritone, which has these thick ass strings (think Bass VI, the low E is something like .10 and they can be lighter or heavier), so it was fun to go back on forth between the two guitars (the Jag-Stang felt like a toy guitar, so playing was 'fun', especially with the easier bends) .

Unfortunately, the saddles in the bridge move alot (especially the ones on the end), and the bottom string just naturally wants to slide down, and the string goes off the fretboard). I raised the action to help a little, still not satisfactory so I am replacing the bridge with a better model, so hopefully I'll be able to accomodate those thinner strings in the future if I want to go back. I may end up going with a tune-o-matic. I'd prefer a Jazzmaster/Jaguar style tremelo, but don't want to route the body. So no, I'll never have the coolest looking Jag-Stang, but playability is what counts for someone on a budget.

Which is why you should try all kinds of strings to find out what suits you. They make sets where the lower three strings are super lights and the top three are heavy, so you get the "best of both worlds" (in theory). I like to mix and match, get a set where the B-string stays in tune better. I hate having to retune that bastard every few songs if I move from barre chords to something with lost of inside fretboard work. Coming soon on a Jag-Stang near you: arpreggios that sound like arse.

You don't have to pay $10+ dollars for a set of strings, you can get three varying pairs for that price on sale, and then mix the sets. You can also order in bulk (but even strings vary from pack to pack, and what are you going to do with a batch of one string that you don't like?), cop fom friends sets, do whatever you can to get a list of gauges you like. Think of strings like socks... you want several pairs, and you might want variety depending on the event. And they feel weird until you've worn them a while...

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Normally GHS 13's on all my guitars and acoustics but just a week ago I picked up a few different sets of flat wounds in 11's and 13's and a few sets with a wound G in 11's and 13's just to see what else is out there.

I've never been much of a fan of light gauges I won't go below 11's, they just get too slinky feeling for my taste. I'm really liking the wound G string tho, really evened out the sound, I always found the plain G to just ring a little be louder then all the rest so I'd always end up setting the pole piece really low but even that a lot of the time didn't help much.

Then you have the difference between steel and nickel strings, I've always played steel myself but a few of the new sets I got are nickel and it's kind of growing on me, takes away some of the brightness which is good for me since I like a lot of mids and treble on my EQ. The warmness of the nickel really balances out the EQ just enough.

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  • 1 month later...
just about everyone uses 11's.

Not me, Fender Bullet 009-042 generally, sometimes I use 009-040 on the Jag-Stang to get some of that Twang added to the sound.

did you set your action higher? light strings tend to buzz or rattle...that's what i get from using 10-46. i guess mixing different strings is a good idea...

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just about everyone uses 11's.

Not me, Fender Bullet 009-042 generally, sometimes I use 009-040 on the Jag-Stang to get some of that Twang added to the sound.

did you set your action higher? light strings tend to buzz or rattle...that's what i get from using 10-46. i guess mixing different strings is a good idea...

Actually, I set my action pretty low, especially compared to what I set it to in the days I used a custom set (at one time I used 014,024,034,044,046, and 060 on my 25.5" scale Kramer). I had basically a custom 014 gauge set, and I had buzz even when the action was set right, but you did not hear it through the amplifier. That's the criteria I use when setting guitars up is that some buzz is allowable, as long as it does not translate through the amplifier.

Also, going from heavier to lighter strings can affect the tension on the neck of the guitar. When I went from 012's on the Jaguar (what it came with) to 009's I had to lighten the truss rod nut about a 10th of a turn to get it just right.

I've found the heavier the strings, your sustain will drop just a little because it takes more energy to keep the string vibrating, but not as much as one would think because the added weight adds inertia to the string. The big part of it later onn was that I was using high gain and doing lots of fancy smancy techniques that were easier on lighter strings, so I went down to 11's and then 9's.

Basically, from my experience.....

Heavy strings take just a hair of sustain away, have a thicker tone, but at the cost of some clarity (hence why you almost never see a Les Paul or metal guitar with 14K buckers with super heavy strings, they are not as clear or punchy as a single coil guitar is by nature). The advantage is they provide warmth to more trebly guitars, build finger strength, and take away some of the buzziness in certain distortion sounds.

A good example of this was when I got the Jaguar I have, and it shipped with D'addario 012's (as I could tell from the ball ends on the strings), it sounded a little thicker, less top end and mids, and a little less punchy, a hair less sustain, but those strings paired with that ABR TOM bridge were not goin' nowhere that's for sure. I once also put 013 gauge flatwounds on the Jag-Stang, that was a huge mistake, my tone was very muffled and lacked lots of definition due to the bassy strings and active pickups, I prefer to use 009-040 strings on that one.

Light strings, on the other hand, have long sustain, and are easy to press down, and put less stress on the guitar as there is less tension (hence why most offset people don't like em' from what I hear, as they really move around on a Jaguar or Jazzmaster if you have a heavy pick attack and don't take what some deem a ridiculous amount of time to tweak it). On some guitars, particularly those with low output pickups or very dense tonewoods in their construction they will sound rather thin and brittle. Tele's with 009's and bad EQ can sound pretty grating on the ears (I always back down the treble and mids when running the Tele, and sometimes for the Jaguar too).

When I can, I put Fender Bullet 009-040' nickel Plated steels on the Jag-Stang, and 009-042' Fender Bullet Stainless on the Jaguar. The nickels are more trebly and react well with my EMG pickups, but the Jaguar I use the darker sounding stainless winds to make the sound more "dark", and the heavier bottom E to make the string both stay in place and bring a touch more warmth to the bottom end.

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  • 3 weeks later...
what kind of strings are jagstangs shipped with from the factory?

.9 fender japonese bullets

Actually, no, it's 009-042 Fender strings, or some cheap japanese made string, non-bullet.

The bullet ended strings are designed for strats, to keep them from shifting around and throwing the guitar out of tune. I use them for the Jag-Stang and jaguar to reduce string breakage due to friction since I use the trem so heavily. It beats having to fire up the soldering iron every time I restring. The friction point is where the string wraps around itself and then runs under the bar/string mount on the trem, bullets don't have this.

Here's a visual of the difference between bullets and normal strings

stringteck.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

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