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Ways to Age a White Pickguard?


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I'm thinking of aging the white pickguard on a 1990s offset so it harmonizes with the Maple neck.

Seems I'd need a technique that sort of dyes or absorbs into the plastic...I thought of spraying it with a light coat of Fender Neck Amber (Guitar ReRanch) but I'm guessing that would scratch off pretty easily.

Any suggestions on ways to do this?

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Lightly sand the whole pickguard, make some really strong, cold black coffee in a container big enough, and soak the pickguard in it for about half an hour. Then take it out and lightly dab it dry with a cloth or kitchen paper. I did the pickup covers on my Jag this way and it looks pretty decent.

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Thanks, Earth, for the additional tips. What I'm shooting for is to age the pickguard to a shade a bit lighter than the Maple fretboard & headstock.

Do you all agree that if I watch it closely I can pull it out when it looks right, then dry it before it gets too dark, no matter which solution I use?

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Several of you said the results of tea or coffee soaking would be modest. So, after my no-results experiment with the white plastic spoon, I thought there would be very low risk in a small test spot on the pickguard itself.

Dabbing tea, no affect. Letting it sit a few minutes. Zip.

Coffee, the same 2 experiments. Nada. Urine crossed my mind.

I'm thinking of a light spray of Fender Neck Amber. But the last thing I want is a pickguard with scrapes through to the white saying "I've been sprayed with Fender Neck Amber and now I look like it, don't I?" :-hateit

So maybe I'll just let it be.

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Several of you said the results of tea or coffee soaking would be modest. So, after my no-results experiment with the white plastic spoon, I thought there would be very low risk in a small test spot on the pickguard itself.

Dabbing tea, no affect. Letting it sit a few minutes. Zip.

Coffee, the same 2 experiments. Nada. Urine crossed my mind.

I'm thinking of a light spray of Fender Neck Amber. But the last thing I want is a pickguard with scrapes through to the white saying "I've been sprayed with Fender Neck Amber and now I look like it, don't I?" :-hateit

So maybe I'll just let it be.

When you say "let it sit for a few minutes", exactly how long is a few minutes? When I did mine it took at least half an hour. To be honest it could even have been up to an hour or so, it was quite a while ago now. And like I said, you need to have done some very light sanding so that the coffee has a surface it can actually bond to, which looks a bit more authentic in my eyes anyway since heavy use of a pickguard or any plastic parts would make it go matt.

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That's the reminder I needed, Richie. To lightly sand it first.

The surface is so smooth and hard, of course it's not going to absorb any color unless it soaks for what, weeks? But the sanding...that will make the difference.

Thanks, mate.

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actually pick guard color is important. Because it's importance is in the aesthetics of the guitar

He has right of reply...

Who said that pickguard colour ISN'T important???

nobody said it wasn't, which is why his comment doesn't make sense.....

herokurdt94 is a weird one... Daniel in disguise, perhaps ;)

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