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Shielding question


indisguise
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I recently shielded my Squier Mustang this week with conductive copper tape.  I put it in the pup cavity, control cavity, pick guard, and on top of the control plate.  I soldered a wire from the control cavity to the pup cavity, measured with a multimeter and they were in sync with one another.  I noticed the bridge ground wire wasn't soldered to the post, so I put a small piece of copper tape on the post and soldered the bridge ground wire.  I wasn't sure if that was necessary or would cause problems, but if anyone has input on that I'd appreciate it.  I went and plugged it in and it sounded great!  No large hums or anything, but today when I plugged in to play I'm getting this crazy buzz.  

 

The thing is that the buzz only comes when a single pickup is on, or when both pickups are out of phase with each other.  When I stand close to my computer or close to the amp, it buzzes, but there is a sweet spot where its dead silent.  The sound is some sort of electro wave (not sure if this is the correct term), sounds like a blaster just buzzing.  I'm not sure if I've made a mistake with my shielding, but when I read the multimeter it looked okay.  What I'm now wondering is should I solder wires from the bottom of the cavities to the top of the pick guard and the control plate?  I made sure to overlap the tape in the cavities when I did the job so they'd touch.  

 

The thing is that even before I shielded the guitar, when the pups were out of phase I got this crazy buzz sound too, is this common for these models?  This is my first mustang btw.  I'd provide pictures but I don't want to take the guitar apart unless I absolutely have to.  Any tips are appreciated, thanks!

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Do you live an old house with the original wiring? I once lived in a house that was built in the 20's that had crazy wiring. Whenever the neighbor behind me fired up a power tool, which was often, I could hear electrical noise through my stereo speakers. Someone had upgraded the sockets to the 3 prong type but the third prong socket wasn't properly grounded. That might have been part of the problem. At the time, I had this hobby of designing and building stereo speakers but I had hard time with the some the sensitive driver measurements I wanted to make because there was so much noise carried on the poorly grounded house wiring; I could see it on my oscilloscope. I used to have trouble with an internet dialup modem too (this was a while ago) which I think was due to the noisy wiring also. So, if your house has old wiring, maybe setup your gear somewhere else- hopefully with good wiring- and see if you get the same noise.

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Hey thanks for the reply!  Yeah the house I live in was built in 1905, not sure if it's been rewired or not, but we have the updated 3 prong outlets.  It got super cold last week and the humidity dropped, what I think the noise was is static in the air?  Still not clear on the root of the problem, the shielding is fine though. Just got a mogami cable, gonna see if that helps too!

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