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Jag Stang or Cyclone I ?


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Hi! Im new to the forum, so, sorry if im reviving some old thread... probably yes. 

Ok, let´s get it started.

Im about to begin with my first job (im 17) and im thinking in saving money for a really nice (offset of course) guitar, preferently humbucker-loaded. 

Here where i live (Argentina) is very rare to see a jagstang. Also cyclones. I dont even knew they existed.

Well, the point is, this guy has these two for sale, and i just love them both. I like the jagstang, but i dont want to be seen as a Cobain poser (sorry, im doing some catarsis here). Also love the cyclone because i always wanted a mustang-shaped guitar since i was a kid who prayed to Cobain and Thurston Moore all nights before sleep (joking), but im so WHICH-ONE-SHOULD-I-PICK.

 My current gear (not fancy, not bad either):

AMP: Fender Champion 40

GUITARS: Epiphone Wilshire Reissue, Yamaha Pacifica s102 esquireized

PEDAL: Big Muff T/W 

 So, i think that´s all. 

 P.S.: I LOVE nirvana, I LOVE Sonic Youth, Also The Pixies are a great inspiration for me, RHCP, Cage the Elephant, Slaves, Sparklehorse, The Strokes, Jack White, and im forgetting a lot

https://http2.mlstatic.com/guitarra-fender-cyclone-mexico-mustan-jaguar-jag-stang-D_NQ_NP_945011-MLA20459776220_102015-F.webp (the 98´CAR Cyclone)

The sonic blue 97´ (not reissue) Jagstang

Thanks!

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Hi mate,

Welcome to the group! 

I have a Jagstang and love it but I also have lots of other guitars, the main issue i have with the Jagstang over a more traditional scale length guitar like the cyclone is the the fretboard radius. If you mainly playing chord based stuff then they both will work fine but if you're into big bends and low actions then the Jagstang isn't ideal for that. 

The Cyclone has a slightly longer scale length at 24.75 and a 9.5 radius which is more like a Gibson then a Fender, the wider radius is good for all types of playing without choking out, the Jagstang is 24 scale length and 7.25 radius so you get some choking with a low action and big bluesy bends.

If you can go and try both guitars go and do that! It's how they feel to you. 

I personally love my Jagstang and play it all the time, but I also have other guitars if I need to go all EVH and melt some faces ;D

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1 hour ago, Ollknot said:

Hi mate,

Welcome to the group! 

I have a Jagstang and love it but I also have lots of other guitars, the main issue i have with the Jagstang over a more traditional scale length guitar like the cyclone is the the fretboard radius. If you mainly playing chord based stuff then they both will work fine but if you're into big bends and low actions then the Jagstang isn't ideal for that. 

The Cyclone has a slightly longer scale length at 24.75 and a 9.5 radius which is more like a Gibson then a Fender, the wider radius is good for all types of playing without choking out, the Jagstang is 24 scale length and 7.25 radius so you get some choking with a low action and big bluesy bends.

If you can go and try both guitars go and do that! It's how they feel to you. 

I personally love my Jagstang and play it all the time, but I also have other guitars if I need to go all EVH and melt some faces ;D

Thanks a lot dude! Yeah, im a rythm guitar player, no doubt about it haha

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Another question. What are the common complaints about both guitars? I know the Jagstang is more of a love-or-hate guitar because of this. I don´t know bout the Cyclone I. Sorry for my english, i just kinda learn it from music and tv shows hahaha.

Sh*t, if i could, i would buy both, cyclone AND jagstang. 

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I don't actually own a Cyclone so can't really comment on any pros or cons but I do have a Jagstang :)

The common complaint with the Jagstang is the trem system and the narrow neck, the nut width is 1.5625, the switches being a bit high so they can catch your hand (this is easily fixed though)

The cyclone uses a Strat style trem system which is much more stable then the Jagstang, personally my Jagstangs trem is fine, I've serviced it and it works great but not everyone is a guitar tech like me :D

The cyclone has a wider neck 1.6785 nut width, which is in between a Gibson and Strat nut width.

If you've got smaller hands then the thinner neck on the Jagstang maybe a better choice.

Essentially they're very similar guitars, with much of the same functions, the Jagstang is a bit smaller then the Cyclone, has a different pickups switching system with has on and off phase switching. They both are HS and the cyclone hasn't got a slanted humbucker.

The Jagstang has a vintage feel to it due to the radius, it's the same as my 57 Strat. 

I got a Jagstang as I'd wanted one in my collection since the late 90s, now it's here and I play her lots. With maintenance the issues of trem stability can be fixed, just don't expect dive bombs

If you're not playing lead and a trem isn't something you use then it's also easy to (block off) as is the Cyclone.

Hope that helps a bit, anymore questions ask away and i'll try to answer :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

I own both, a jagstang and a cyclone I. They are different. You should play them before you buy. The jagstang feels and sounds much more like a mustang than the cyclone. Cyclones neck is chunkier, the body is thicker and heavier than a mustang. I love both and don't know, which you should choose. Better you try...

29414575156_ff5c379b0c_z.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

I would say the Cyclone is definitely more of a solid workhorse and more flexible in terms of having a really playable neck. Cyclones are one of my favorite guitars though... I have the Squier in LPB, a graffiti yellow one like above with Lace Sensors, a wilki, LSR nut, and locking tuners a la Strat Plus, and I have one of the USA models in LPB that were only sold in the Japanese market which I put Lawrence Microcoils in. All of them are great and really fun. The Squier has a little thinner neck but is sometimes even the most fun to play. I actually like everything about it except the bridge pickup. I would probably change that if I played it all the time. The most recent run of Squier's are alder where most of the Mexican ones are Poplar I believe. I think the last run of the Mexico Cyclone I was listed as alder but they wouldn't be too common.. I am actually not sure which mine is made from. I have actually never taken a group shot so I suppose it is time! Not sure if Google photos will cooperate posting a pic here but lets give it a shot:

zhR9Nxn-is1ng_Dr3dkg6m6okTI7MdoV64eWaO0R

-HB-__eR3uValpaZ5iL9HHqyRsOnlAG1iqe-s4Pf

You can see that the shade of the US version is quite different than the Squier.

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  • 10 months later...
On 1/31/2017 at 7:21 AM, Ollknot said:

Hi mate,

Welcome to the group! 

I have a Jagstang and love it but I also have lots of other guitars, the main issue i have with the Jagstang over a more traditional scale length guitar like the cyclone is the the fretboard radius. If you mainly playing chord based stuff then they both will work fine but if you're into big bends and low actions then the Jagstang isn't ideal for that. 

The Cyclone has a slightly longer scale length at 24.75 and a 9.5 radius which is more like a Gibson then a Fender, the wider radius is good for all types of playing without choking out, the Jagstang is 24 scale length and 7.25 radius so you get some choking with a low action and big bluesy bends.

If you can go and try both guitars go and do that! It's how they feel to you. 

I personally love my Jagstang and play it all the time, but I also have other guitars if I need to go all EVH and melt some faces ;D

Hmmm, I’ve never had the problem with bends on my Jagstang , my actions really low. Could you elaborate on why bends might be choked out with that radius and scale length combo? I’ve never understood why it happens on most guitars like that and I’d like to know. ?

thanks- gunner

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