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My new Jag-Stang with set up tips! (now with pictures)


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I picked up a blue 1997 Jag-Stang recently for $250. It had a few dings, no tremolo bar, & was buzzing a bit in the store. It was marked $299 but I talked them down. I've owned 2 or 3 Jag-Stangs before but have sold or traded them because of a few annoyances. I'm keeping this one because of some of the set up tips I've learned in recent years.

1)Buzz I loosened the truss rod a 1/4 turn & the neck went exactly where it needed to be. Japanese Fenders just seem to work that way. A 1/4 turn one way or the other is all it takes. No more buzz.

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NOTICE THE INCREASED ANGLE OF THE STOP BAR

2)Dynamic Vibrato I have learned from my 1975 Mustang that the Dynamic Vibrato can be used & can stay in tune. Leo Fender was a genius but his original Statocaster tremolo & the Dynamic Vibrato both share the same fatal flaw.... no zero point when they are left floating. When you finish being the wang bar king it will never return to the same point. It's always a little sharp or flat. To solve this on a Stratocaster you simply tighten the screws on the spring claw all the way so the vibrato is flat on the body & it only losens the strings. On the Mustang style bridge you just tighten the allen screws through the small holes on the tail piece all the way tight. There is then no need to replace the bridge or lock it down. It's as good is locked. I bend the strings to go tighter & use the wang to go lower. When you let the bar go it always returns to the same point. The bar will stick up too much but it can be bent down to a useable position. If you dont use the wang this should be the simplest solution. I also ordered a replacement bar online fo $7.

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3)Drop those Switches! The Mustang style switches are too darn high! They actually scratch up & bother the palm of my right hand. I was able to put 3 washers between the pick guard & the switches on the original screws to lower them to a better position. I can still use them well but they are more flush with the pick guard.

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4) Pickups! I instantly knew I wanted to replace the pickups but I wanted to do it on the cheap. I put a Duncan Designed single coil in the neck & a HB-102 B in the bridge. The pair cost me like $30 on eBay. I figured it was a temporary solution but I really like both of them. The alnico magnets blow away the ceramic magnets in the stock pickups. I think they sound great in this guitar. I figured I'd upgrade them down the road but they are going to stay. I also really like the black pickups in the white mother of toilet seat pick guard. I do want to find a solid black single coil cover with no holes for the neck pickup.

5) Stuff I can't change I wish Kurt would have asked for body contours, a straight rout for the bridge pickup, & a stratocaster bridge. The countour bothers me the most.

All in all a fun gutar for less than $300.

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Good hints! And not a bad price to pay for a Jag-Stang.

Offtopic: Could you give a hint on how to adjust the truss rod? You say that after adjustment "neck went exactly where it needed to be", where should it be? Or do you know a link to a guide to do this?

I've got this topic here (http://www.jag-stang.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=14534), where the main problem is probably solved already (I had adjusted the action height to insane high), but nobody has been able to give me clear advice about adjusting the truss rod. And I'd be happy to know how to do it by myself, not taking it to a guitar shop.

I guess that when changing to heavier strings, like I did, I should probably loosen the truss rod a bit to let it pull the neck straighter. And that is done by turning the screw.... counter-clockwise? How should the neck look after that? :?

Sorry if this messes up your topic.

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Truss Rods 101

1) DO NOT turn more than 1/4 to 1/2 turn either way if you don't know what you are doing.

2) What we are going for is more releaf or less relief.

RESOURCEtrussrodview.jpg

Here are two good articles:

http://www.tdpri.com/resourceTRUSS.htm

http://fretnotguitarrepair.com/trussrods.htm

The most important thing the second one says is:

Adjusting your truss rod Word of caution: While I do not feel adjusting a truss rod is rocket science you should be aware that a broken truss rod is very bad news and normally...a very expensive repair. On inexpensive instruments broken truss rods are usually the kiss of death unless the rod can be removed without removal of the fingerboard. I am not trying to scare anyone, understanding how a rod works can save you from a catastrophe.

If possible...first practice on a yard sale special. Tighten and loosen the nut and watch how it effects the necks relief. While I can certainly offer players some knowledge and understanding what I can't give you is experience.

You may wish to make a mark on the truss rod nut, when possible, so you can gauge your progress or return it to it's previous position if necessary.

Use the correct size Allen wrench or socket so you don't damage the nut. Martin's and many other acoustic guitars with truss rod nuts beneath the f/b extension use a 5mm allen head wrench. Gibson's and others with a larger acorn style nut at the peghead use a 5/16" nut socket. Taylor uses a smaller 1/4" nut socket. Many Fender Electrics use a 1/8" allen head wrench.

Always start by loosening the nut first. If it is already as tight as it will go and you try to tighten it some more...pow! Adious truss rod, hello heartache.

Make adjustments in small increments. A quarter of a turn would be allot of adjustment for most instruments. If your neck has a tremendous amount of relief in it and there is very little change after a good deal of tightening you're probably better off getting some advice.

Adjustments to the truss rod are normally made with the instrument tuned to pitch. Without full tension on an instrument you can not judge your progress or effect. An exception would be Gotoh's side adjuster. There are also instances where I will clamp the neck into a backbow before attempting to tightening the nut.

If you encounter resistance, think twice about what you are about to do. It is so inexpensive to have a truss rod adjusted that it just doesn't pay to take a big risk.

Relief should be evaluated after each adjustment. Some necks take time to settle.

Dry threads should be lubricated to prevent seizure.

All of that is really good advice from Fret Not Gutar Repair.

If my action looked like your action I would bring my guitar & all the parts to a luthier to try & salvage.

Best,

Dave

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davec:

Thanks! Those links were really useful, and also your tips. I'll think about this, if it's smart to do it by myself or not, adjusting the truss rod. The action height of my guitar is like that because I lifted the bridge sky high in hope to stop all possible buzzing.. It was pretty normal before I laid my hands on it! :oops::lol:

EDIT: Good looking guitar now that you put the pics here too! That switch dropping -mod is really a good idea, I've tumbled with the switches while playing numerous times. I just made a year or two ago a little different kind of a mod there, put a piece of colourless plastic there with holes for the switches. But it's a bit ugly thing, just useful for me.. :roll:

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  • 3 weeks later...

I had mine locked down with bolts and washers and i have a TOM bridge, and the intonation sucks. I am not able to adjust the bass side enough on the saddle, and i even tried raising the bridge and taking the tape of the bridge posts, so i can tilt the bridge, and still off. so im trying now to go back to the original design with the springs but im not sure exactly how to do it. can anyone help?

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I had mine locked down with bolts and washers and i have a TOM bridge, and the intonation sucks. I am not able to adjust the bass side enough on the saddle, and i even tried raising the bridge and taking the tape of the bridge posts, so i can tilt the bridge, and still off. so im trying now to go back to the original design with the springs but im not sure exactly how to do it. can anyone help?

So you're having the same trouble I have with my JS? I have also locked the trem so it' s hardtail, and I've tilted the bridge too for intonation, but it still sucks. Now I know why.. See this thread about the problem:

http://www.jag-stang.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=14534

If you have raised the bridge on the bass side, you just might have made your problem worse. See the pics on my topic, if you've got the action (strings) too high like in my pics, it might make the intonation impossible.

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it's because a tom isn't designed to go on a jag-stang. the adjustment isn't enough and tom posts are installed offset from eachother. bass side further back

not to mention the 7 1/4" radius of the neck and the 12" radius of the ToM...

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Have you ever tested with some (preferably electronic) tuning device the pitch when fretting your strings on the 1st fret?

In my Jag-Stang, when tuned to standard E, most of the 1st fret picthes were like 1/4 sharp, when I pressed the string as light as possible so the pitch doesn't raise because of heavy pressing. I filed the nut to fix the problem, but it added a bit buzzing I think, and that's why I raised the action too high an messed up the intonation, or made it impossible. If the 1st fret values are randomly between pure notes to 1/4 sharp notes, G chord can't sound very good. But I don't know if it's wise to file the nut by yourself if you're not a guitar tech! :?

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I picked up a blue 1997 Jag-Stang recently for $250. It had a few dings, no tremolo bar, & was buzzing a bit in the store. It was marked $299 but I talked them down. I've owned 2 or 3 Jag-Stangs before but have sold or traded them because of a few annoyances. I'm keeping this one because of some of the set up tips I've learned in recent years.

1)Buzz I loosened the truss rod a 1/4 turn & the neck went exactly where it needed to be. Japanese Fenders just seem to work that way. A 1/4 turn one way or the other is all it takes. No more buzz.

js1.jpg

NOTICE THE INCREASED ANGLE OF THE STOP BAR

2)Dynamic Vibrato I have learned from my 1975 Mustang that the Dynamic Vibrato can be used & can stay in tune. Leo Fender was a genius but his original Statocaster tremolo & the Dynamic Vibrato both share the same fatal flaw.... no zero point when they are left floating. When you finish being the wang bar king it will never return to the same point. It's always a little sharp or flat. To solve this on a Stratocaster you simply tighten the screws on the spring claw all the way so the vibrato is flat on the body & it only losens the strings. On the Mustang style bridge you just tighten the allen screws through the small holes on the tail piece all the way tight. There is then no need to replace the bridge or lock it down. It's as good is locked. I bend the strings to go tighter & use the wang to go lower. When you let the bar go it always returns to the same point. The bar will stick up too much but it can be bent down to a useable position. If you dont use the wang this should be the simplest solution. I also ordered a replacement bar online fo $7.

js3.jpg

3)Drop those Switches! The Mustang style switches are too darn high! They actually scratch up & bother the palm of my right hand. I was able to put 3 washers between the pick guard & the switches on the original screws to lower them to a better position. I can still use them well but they are more flush with the pick guard.

js2.jpg

4) Pickups! I instantly knew I wanted to replace the pickups but I wanted to do it on the cheap. I put a Duncan Designed single coil in the neck & a HB-102 B in the bridge. The pair cost me like $30 on eBay. I figured it was a temporary solution but I really like both of them. The alnico magnets blow away the ceramic magnets in the stock pickups. I think they sound great in this guitar. I figured I'd upgrade them down the road but they are going to stay. I also really like the black pickups in the white mother of toilet seat pick guard. I do want to find a solid black single coil cover with no holes for the neck pickup.

5) Stuff I can't change I wish Kurt would have asked for body contours, a straight rout for the bridge pickup, & a stratocaster bridge. The countour bothers me the most.

All in all a fun gutar for less than $300.

finnale a solution i dont tryed yet

show me inside details and regulation of bridge please

my jag-stang dont stayed on tune easy :| i locked them

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  • 3 weeks later...
I was looking at the bridge on your jag-stang and I noticed the screw head side is on the back towards the tremolo. I just bought a jag-stang and on mine the screw head side is toward the pickup. Is mine reversed or is yours?

On a tailpiece, which has been flipped, the strings run straight trough it like this:

jsmod05.jpg

If it's like the way it was originally meant to be, the strings go through the tailpiece pointing away from the neck (don't have words to explain this better) and then they are run under the tailpiece and then over the saddles to the tuners..

Said short:

Twisted tailpiece: strings go through it, not under it. Tailpiece normally: strings go through and under it.

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Ok, that explains the tailpiece. But the screw heads for the saddles on the bridge face my pickups, on your pic they face the tailpiece like the other pics above. Does it matter which direction they face? I thought it might have been done just for easier access when intonating but I am not sure. I am going to be putting new strings on it and wanted to know if I should leave it or put it so it faces the tailpiece like in your pic and the other pic above.

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Ok, that explains the tailpiece. But the screw heads for the saddles on the bridge face my pickups, on your pic they face the tailpiece like the other pics above. Does it matter which direction they face? --

Oh, someone has flipped the bridge on your guitar! :lol:

Well, I think it's originally put there screws towards the tailpiece, but I'm not sure if it's necessary. If you don't need it to be reversed maybe it would be ok the normal way?

Maybe the side of the bridge with screws is a little bit lower than the side with no screws (by looking at the pics here), so check out that it doesn't touch the strings if you leave it reversed. It might cause the strings to break easier if they're "on the edge" there.. Also check out that the saddles aren't able to move there back and forth (when using vibrato, tuning strings, bending strings etc..), if I recall it right the screws can be moved in the bridge, only the little springs there hold them in place. But I'm not sure if it matters or not.

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